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Planning the Retirement of Your Dreams

For many years, I have worked with a couple that had a very specific retirement dream. They wanted to travel the country in their camper. At first, I thought this was something that would be a passing fancy.  Over the years, many clients have expressed visions for retirement and yet many of them evolve over time to something entirely different. This couple was unique. They were very consistent and in sync with their dream. Don’t get me wrong. They loved their careers in medicine and education and were dedicated and true professionals. But, when they talked about riding through the country without an agenda or a definite plan but instead stopping wherever they found something interesting, they always lit up with smiles.

Creating Liquidity for Retirement

Successful business owners often struggle with how to exit their businesses and create enough liquidity to support their retirement.  If you are a business owner, there is a good chance that your business is your most valuable asset.  However, research shows that over 70 % of business owners do not have a formalized exit strategy. While the details of exit planning and getting your business in the best shape to maximize its’ value and transition from your ownership and control are beyond the scope of this post, there are a variety of ways that you can create liquidity to support your retirement.

Navigating Health Insurance After Retirement

For retirees of all ages, adequate health insurance continues to be a chief concern.

Healthcare coverage has become an annual decision and, for most, there is a single enrollment period, generally in the fall/winter. Typically, only those with a “qualifying event” (divorce, death, etc.) are allowed to secure coverage outside the annual enrollment period.

Financial Planning During Divorce and Overcoming Bumps in the Road

Planning for your future can be confusing and intimidating even when life goes according to plan, but when you are faced with an unexpected “turn in the road” it can be overwhelming and cause a feeling of hopelessness. 

Benefits of Keeping Life Insurance in Retirement

One of the questions I often get from clients who are planning on retiring is whether they should maintain their life insurance. Normally, one might think that that they do not need life insurance in retirement because life insurance is designed to protect against financial loss, and if you have enough money to retire, why would you need it? But, in certain situations, there are good and valid reasons to continue your life insurance during your retirement: 

Deciding to Age in Place – Or Not

Retirees are individuals, not a homogenized demographic. But there is one issue that galvanizes them. The great majority of retirees, no matter what their age, want to live out their lives in their homes.

When a retiree’s physical limitations change, it is likely time to consider a new living arrangement. But before you make any decisions, ask yourself these three key questions:

Where Am I Going to Live Now That I’m Retired?

A really important part of your retirement vision is deciding WHERE you are going to live. Housing can be one of those decisions that is really difficult to “get right.” Once you’re retired, and no longer tied to your current home or town by your job, the possibilities can seem endless – and feel overwhelming! Getting this decision wrong can be expensive. 

Budgeting For Travel – Now and Later

Whether it’s palm trees, museums or shooting the rapids, travel continues to be a popular pastime for retirees. While the scenery may change from year to year or season to season, one thing never changes: travel can be expensive. Planning ahead and traveling in the off season can save.
 
Many retirees opt to travel early in retirement when health is not a concern. For some, travel expenditures are assumed for a set number of years during the first part of retirement. For others, travel is planned throughout retirement. 
 

What’s the best way to handle company stock without getting killed by taxes?

Company stock, especially if it was awarded as part of a long term incentive package, can be a terrific way to build wealth. But it can be a double-edged sword, too. Over-concentration in a single stock probably represents one of the biggest mistakes we have seen retirees make. And when the stock is from the company where they built their career, they may have a strong emotional attachment that can cloud judgement. 

Setting aside funds to cover future health expenses

The old saying used to be that you could only count on two things: death and taxes. Today, we need to amend that include a third constant: the rising cost of healthcare. For some time now, medical costs have increased at a pace that exceeds inflation. No one is predicting a change in that pattern.

To cope with these rising costs, we recommend you treat health expenses just as you do the other line items in your budget. Factor this cost into your budget and understand its impact on your cash flow.