Due Date Approaches for 2017 Federal Income Tax Returns

Alarm Clock

Tax filing season is here again. If you haven't done so already, you'll want to start pulling things together — that includes getting your hands on a copy of your 2016 tax return and gathering W-2s, 1099s, and deduction records. You'll need these records whether you're preparing your own return or paying someone else to prepare your tax return for you.

Don't procrastinate
The filing deadline for most individuals is Tuesday, April 17, 2018. That's because April 15 falls on a Sunday, and Emancipation Day, a legal holiday in Washington, D.C., is celebrated on Monday, April 16. Unlike in some years, there's no extra time for residents of Massachusetts or Maine to file because Patriots' Day (a holiday in those two states) falls on April 16 — the same day that Emancipation Day is being celebrated.

Filing for an extension
If you don't think you're going to be able to file your federal income tax return by the due date, you can file for and obtain an extension using IRS Form 4868, Application for Automatic Extension of Time to File U.S. Individual Income Tax Return. Filing this extension gives you an additional six months (to October 15, 2018) to file your federal income tax return. You can also file for an extension electronically — instructions on how to do so can be found in the Form 4868 instructions.

Filing for an automatic extension does not provide any additional time to pay your tax. When you file for an extension, you have to estimate the amount of tax you will owe and pay this amount by the April filing due date. If you don't pay the amount you've estimated, you may owe interest and penalties. In fact, if the IRS believes that your estimate was not reasonable, it may void your extension.

Special rules apply if you're living outside the country or serving in the military and on duty outside the United States. In these circumstances you are generally allowed an automatic two-month extension (to June 15, 2018) without filing Form 4868, though interest will be owed on any taxes due that are paid after April 17. If you served in a combat zone or qualified hazardous duty area, you may be eligible for a longer extension of time to file.

What if you owe?
One of the biggest mistakes you can make is not filing your return because you owe money. If your return shows a balance due, file and pay the amount due in full by the due date if possible. If there's no way that you can pay what you owe, file the return and pay as much as you can afford. You'll owe interest and possibly penalties on the unpaid tax, but you'll limit the penalties assessed by filing your return on time, and you may be able to work with the IRS to pay the remaining balance (options can include paying the unpaid balance in installments).

Expecting a refund?
The IRS is stepping up efforts to combat identity theft and tax refund fraud. New, more aggressive filters that are intended to curtail fraudulent refunds may inadvertently delay some legitimate refund requests. In fact, since last year's tax filing season, the IRS has been required to hold refunds on all tax returns claiming the earned income tax credit or the refundable portion of the child tax credit until at least February 15.1

Most filers, though, can expect a refund check to be issued within 21 days of the IRS receiving a return.

1 IRS.gov (IR-2017-181, IRS Encourages Taxpayers to Check Their Withholding; Checking Now Helps Avoid Surprises at Tax Time, October 30, 2017)

Four Tips for Downsizing in Retirement

Going through years of accumulated possessions and memories is probably not how you envisioned spending part of your retirement. It may sound like a daunting and emotionally draining task, but downsizing could be a savvy financial move, especially if you haven't reached your retirement savings goals.

1. Set goals for downsizing
Before you make any decisions, think about why you might want to downsize in the first place. Is it because you want to save on mortgage payments or other monthly expenses? Or are you looking to free up some cash to help pursue your lifestyle goals in retirement?
No matter what your specific goals may be, understanding the connection between them and downsizing can help motivate you to follow through with it.

2. Determine the best time to downsize
It's said that timing is everything, so choosing when to downsize will be an important decision to make. One benefit of downsizing early in retirement is that mortgage payments and other related expenses (such as utilities and real estate taxes) could decrease, presuming that you are downsizing to a less expensive residence. This could mean you have extra funds to pursue new hobbies and activities right away in retirement. You might even be fortunate enough to have sufficient funds from the sale of a larger home to pay for a smaller home with cash, thus eliminating or decreasing your mortgage payment, or significantly increasing cash flow. However, the decision to pay cash for a new home is one you will want to consider carefully with the assistance of your advisor. In some cases, tying up significant equity in your home can actually make it more difficult to meet your other retirement goals, depending upon mortgage rates and other factors. You should also note that there may be advantages to delaying downsizing. If you wait to do it later in retirement, you might have a better sense of just how much you need to downsize to support your current lifestyle. Plus, timing your downsizing plans with a stronger real estate market could mean that you sell and/or purchase a new home at a more opportune time.

3. Be realistic about costs
There are several costs to think about if you are downsizing your home: the worth of your current home, the cost of a new home, and the fees and expenses associated with relocating. Before you start boxing up your belongings, run the numbers. Start by contacting local real estate agents to receive estimates of your home's value. Compare the estimates so you can develop an idea of how much you might be able to get for your home. Research online to see what homes in your neighborhood have sold for recently — this can also help you determine your home's potential selling price.

Take similar steps when you look for your new home. One option that might be available is to rent a new house or apartment for a length of time before buying it. That way, you'll learn whether the home and the location suit you, helping you avoid buyer's remorse.
If you're buying a new home, don't forget to account for the down payment, home inspection, closing costs, and other associated charges. Factoring all of the numbers into the equation may reveal whether downsizing makes the most sense for you and your financial situation.

4. Consider downsizing your belongings, not just your home
For some people, downsizing might simply mean cutting down on clutter rather than relocating. It's easier said than done, particularly if you've amassed many belongings over time. When purging your home, consider the following:

  • Take your time. Don't feel pressured to clear out your entire home in one fell swoop. Instead, make a plan to do one room or section of your home at a time.
  • Involve your children. If you have kids, consider asking them for their help. Many hands make light work, and your children may end up expressing interest in items they would like to have.
  • Sell valuables. Maybe you can't find a new home for that antique necklace you never wear or the rare baseball cards collecting dust in your attic. Consider having those items appraised and selling them to an auction house or online. Depending on how many items you're selling and their worth, you could wind up with quite a bit of money that you can use to help cushion your retirement fund.
  • Donate gently used items. Find out if there are any local organizations in your community that could benefit from furniture, clothing, or any other possessions in good condition that you want to get rid of. Some donation outlets may even offer free pickup of certain items, saving you time and hassle.
  • Clear out junk. Chances are you've accumulated items that you simply won't be able to give away or sell. Discard belongings that serve no purpose other than taking up space in your home. You might be surprised by how much room you could free up.

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