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Identity Theft Insurance: What You Need to Know

Identity Theft Insurance What You Need to Know
Rick Henderson, CPA, CFP®, AIF®
October 13, 2020

Most likely, we know someone who has been a victim of identity theft. In 2019, 14.4 million people were victims of identity theft.1 Identity theft can happen in a number of ways – in-person, online, over email or on the phone. It usually comes out of the blue, and no matter how it occurs, identity theft affects a large number of people per year.

In order to fix the mess left in the wake of identity theft, it can cost the victim considerable time and money. That’s where having identity theft insurance can come in handy. Identity theft insurance can be used to help protect yourself against thieves, hackers and other criminal scammers. Recently, I have been getting more questions about identity theft insurance, so I thought I would share some of the facts surrounding it so you can make the right decision when it comes to obtaining your own coverage.

Long-Term Effects of Identity Theft

It can take months or even years to untangle the path of destruction left by identity theft. This can be difficult and stressful to deal with – especially if you don’t have insurance. You may recover some of the money stolen from you, but not all of the lasting effects will be financial. It can also lower your credit score, make it harder to get a loan and even affect your job prospects.

Ultimately, you want to do everything you can to protect your identity by keeping your personal information safe. This includes making sure all your records, identification items such as your passport, social security card and birth certificate are all kept in a fireproof safe, and old banking records and statements are shredded.

When it comes to cybersecurity, keeping all your online information safe from hackers is important. Regularly update passwords, don’t allow other people to access your records and be careful about the information you share on social media. Criminals are always looking for personal information that may make it easier for them to steal your identity or impersonate you. With the information they’re able to find online, they can take out loans or open up credit cards in your name.

What Does Identity Theft Insurance Cover?

Identity theft insurance will usually, at the most basic level, cover the monetary loss from the theft. It can also include coverage of the cost of restoration services where getting your affairs untangled goes much faster. That includes using a case manager or fraud specialist that will be able to do the legwork and spend the time it takes to recover your identity.

The cost to replace your identification papers, like passport and birth certificate, will be covered as well. If you need an attorney, your legal fees will also be covered under your identity theft insurance policy.

How To Get Identity Theft Insurance

Certain homeowners insurance policies, or even renters insurance, will offer a rider or endorsement at an additional cost to you. This would act as an extension of your regular policy that covers identity theft. It might be an extra couple of bucks per month, but it will cover losses or other expenses typically not protected by your normal homeowner’s policy.

Before you decide to purchase identity theft insurance, it’s important to find out what the policy limits are, how much your deductible will be, how much money loss it actually covers and if legal fees or restoration services are included. The more comprehensive and complete the policy is, the more you’ll be covered if identity theft, unfortunately, happens to you.

Protecting your identity and safeguarding your assets are important.  If you have any questions regarding protecting yourself from identity theft, or about identity theft insurance, please reach out to your Atlanta Financial advisor.

 

  1. https://www.iii.org/fact-statistic/facts-statistics-identity-theft-and-cybercrime

 

 

This content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information, and provided by Twenty Over Ten. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security.

 

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