Atlanta Financial Newsroom

Key Retirement and Tax Numbers for 2019

Key Retirement and Tax Numbers for 2019
AFA
January 12, 2019

Every year, the Internal Revenue Service announces cost-of-living adjustments that affect contribution limits for retirement plans and various tax deduction, exclusion, exemption, and threshold amounts. Here are a few of the key adjustments for 2019.

Employer retirement plans

  • Employees who participate in 401(k), 403(b), and most 457 plans can defer up to $19,000 in compensation in 2019 (up from $18,500 in 2018); employees age 50 and older can defer up to an additional $6,000 in 2019 (the same as in 2018).
  • Employees participating in a SIMPLE retirement plan can defer up to $13,000 in 2019 (up from $12,500 in 2018), and employees age 50 and older can defer up to an additional $3,000 in 2019 (the same as in 2018).

IRAs

The combined annual limit on contributions to traditional and Roth IRAs increased to $6,000 in 2019 (up from $5,500 in 2018), with individuals age 50 and older able to contribute an additional $1,000. For individuals who are covered by a workplace retirement plan, the deduction for contributions to a traditional IRA is phased out for the following modified adjusted gross income (AGI) ranges:

(AGI) ranges

The 2019 phaseout range is $193,000 – $203,000 (up from $189,000 – $199,000 in 2018) when the individual making the IRA contribution is not covered by a workplace retirement plan but is filing jointly with a spouse who is covered.

The modified AGI phase-out ranges for individuals to make contributions to a Roth IRA are:

The modified AGI phaseout ranges

Estate and gift tax

  • The annual gift tax exclusion for 2019 is $15,000, the same as in 2018.
  • The gift and estate tax basic exclusion amount for 2019 is $11,400,000, up from $11,180,000 in 2018.

Kiddie tax

Under the kiddie tax rules, unearned income above $2,200 in 2019 (up from $2,100 in 2018) is taxed using the trust and estate income tax brackets. The kiddie tax rules apply to: (1) those under age 18, (2) those age 18 whose earned income doesn’t exceed one-half of their support, and (3) those ages 19 to 23 who are full-time students and whose earned income doesn’t exceed one-half of their support.

Standard Deduction Chart

The additional standard deduction amount for the blind or aged (age 65 or older) in 2019 is $1,650 (up from $1,600 in 2018) for single/HOH or $1,300 (the same as in 2018) for all other filing statuses. Special rules apply if you can be claimed as a dependent by another taxpayer.

Alternative minimum tax (AMT)

Share This:

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on google
Google+

Where Does the Travel Industry Stand as Summer 2021 Kicks Off?

The travel industry has begun to see growing demand as we move closer to summer. However, not all travel will be the same, as much of the demand is directly related to the COVID-19 vaccine and reduced CDC restrictions. Instead, industry trends have emerged based on individual comfort levels as they apply to different modes of travel.
Below we will explore some of the factors that have contributed to an increase in travel and how different industries are responding to it.

Read More »

Understanding Inflation in 2021: What Investors Need to Know

Following a year of economic instability, it appears that many of us are turning our attention to something that’s been around for decades, but has recently piqued national interest – inflation. In fact, a recent study found that people are Googling the word “inflation” at a rapid rate, with a peak not seen since 2010…

Read More »

Yearly Archive

Author Archive