Harrison Fant

Harrison FantWealth Manager
Phone: 678.397.1769
Fax: 770.261.5381
hfant@atlantafinancial.com
LinkedIn

Since Harrison was young, he always had a strong interest in problem-solving, from elementary school brain teasers to the New York Times Sunday crossword puzzle.  Growing up he saw his father, who has been in financial planning for over 30-years, apply that same problem-solving mentality to the real world with his clients.  That real-world application sparked an interest in using personal financial planning to solve the puzzle of financial independence for others.

As a Wealth Manager with Atlanta Financial, he specializes in working with pre-retirees to ensure they are on the path to financial freedom.  Harrison enjoys working with young professionals to make educated and informed decisions about their finances early on to help set them up to achieve both their short- and long-term goals.  To that end, he has a particular focus on working within the YPFIT™ program to guide young professionals toward financial independence.  He is also passionate about providing guidance and mentoring to younger associates on the AFA team.

Harrison graduated from the University of Georgia’s Terry College of Business in 2013 with a BBA in Finance (Go Dawgs!) and spent the first year of his career as a Financial Advisor with The Piedmont Group.  He joined Atlanta Financial as an Associate Advisor in 2014 and quickly worked his way up to his current position as a Wealth Manager.  Harrison is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ professional as well as an Accredited Investment Fiduciary® designee.

Harrison and his wife, Erin, live in Roswell with their daughter Blair and their “fur-child” – a 65-pound Goldendoodle named Knox.  In their free time they love to travel and explore new restaurants around town.  Their travel shortlist includes Greece, Spain and Iceland, and they are always open to recommendations!  Erin and Harrison tend to get along 364 days of the year, with the exception being the annually contentious Georgia-Auburn game.

Coronavirus & Student Loans: What You Need to Know

Coronavirus & Student Loans: What You Need to Know

As of the end of 2019, student loan debt reached $1.48 trillion in the US, with approximately 45 million borrowers across the country.  Over the course of the COVID-19 pandemic, many Americans have experienced unprecedented financial instability.  This means that for 45 million Americans, paying down student loan debt may be harder than ever before.

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Why Fear Shouldn’t Drive Your Investing

Why Fear Shouldn’t Drive Your Investing

As the world has dealt with the COVID-19 pandemic over the last several months, we’ve seen an unprecedented impact to global stock markets.  The decline in US and foreign equities was surprising in both its severity and speed, with the S&P 500 falling more than 30% in just over a month.  This sharp drop from recent highs caused some investors to panic and race for the exits, preferring the safety of cash or treasuries to the volatile stock market.  While getting out of the market during a “freefall” might seem like the best move, over the long run it can actually do more harm than good.

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Four Steps to (Effectively) Work from Home

Four Steps to (Effectively) Work from Home

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has caused significant changes to everyday life as we know it.  One of the most prominent change is the push for employees to work from home (WFH) rather than continue to operate out of shared spaces.  For many young professionals, working from home – at least part time – is nothing new.  I’ve talked with several friends who have transitioned from working at home two to three days per week to full-time, and even more who were already 100% WFH.  But for the rest of us who are venturing into a work from home routine for the first time, it’s important to take steps to maintain both our health and sanity.  Here are four steps I’ve found helpful in combating some of the common pitfalls of WFH…

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The Better Way to Budget – In Reverse

The Better Way to Budget – In Reverse

Around the beginning of the year I tend to get a lot of questions – both from clients and friends – about how to do a better job budgeting and saving on a regular basis.  Studies have shown that saving money is one of the top five New Year’s resolutions, and is also one of the top five resolutions most people fail.  The reason for that is simple:  Our traditional version of budgeting is difficult to establish, time-consuming to manage and allows minimal margin for error.

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