Tag: YPFIT

Why Fear Shouldn’t Drive Your Investing

As the world has dealt with the COVID-19 pandemic over the last several months, we’ve seen an unprecedented impact to global stock markets.  The decline in US and foreign equities was surprising in both its severity and speed, with the S&P 500 falling more than 30% in just over a month.  This sharp drop from recent highs caused some investors to panic and race for the exits, preferring the safety of cash or treasuries to the volatile stock market.  While getting out of the market during a “freefall” might seem like the best move, over the long run it can actually do more harm than good.

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Four Steps to (Effectively) Work from Home

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has caused significant changes to everyday life as we know it.  One of the most prominent change is the push for employees to work from home (WFH) rather than continue to operate out of shared spaces.  For many young professionals, working from home – at least part time – is nothing new.  I’ve talked with several friends who have transitioned from working at home two to three days per week to full-time, and even more who were already 100% WFH.  But for the rest of us who are venturing into a work from home routine for the first time, it’s important to take steps to maintain both our health and sanity.  Here are four steps I’ve found helpful in combating some of the common pitfalls of WFH…

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Radical Generosity, a Growing Family Ambition

For young and growing families, it can be hard at times to justify a commitment to charitable giving. But philanthropy can take on several forms when it comes down to it. I’ve heard it referred to as the “three T’s of giving”- time, talent and treasure. All three are clearly very valuable aspects of our lives because each are finite in their own respect. As a wealth manager, I obviously see a great deal of focus placed on the monetary side of philanthropy and my professional experience tells me that our individual perspective on personal wealth is often a driver for assessing whether it is (or feels) appropriate to give away our money or things. The more you feel as though you have yet to achieve your own financial security, the more difficult it is to be motivated to give financially. Furthermore, when having a family to provide for, the decision can be increasingly difficult but arguably more important.

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The Better Way to Budget – In Reverse

Around the beginning of the year I tend to get a lot of questions – both from clients and friends – about how to do a better job budgeting and saving on a regular basis.  Studies have shown that saving money is one of the top five New Year’s resolutions, and is also one of the top five resolutions most people fail.  The reason for that is simple:  Our traditional version of budgeting is difficult to establish, time-consuming to manage and allows minimal margin for error.

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Remember in December: 8 Critical Ways to Organize your Finances Before Ringing in 2020

I’d like to believe that everyone understands the value in a year-end review of their personal finances. Statistics that I’ve seen indicate that over half of people who make resolutions indicate a change to household finances and saving money is a priority in the new year1. What is a bit of surprise to me is that so many put off (or neglect all together) actually reviewing their finances before year’s end. My conclusion: one of the biggest deterrents is the time it takes to get things organized.

When it comes to being successful with money, strong organization will empower you more than anything else you can do to take control of your finances moving forward. With my personal and professional understanding of the challenges of this process, I’ve put together an 8-step checklist to get your finances organized, take inventory of where you stand, and ultimately get you ready to close the books on 2019.

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Baby Steps: Financial Moves for Every Decade of Life

Recently, my husband and I took care of our 12-month old granddaughter while our daughter and son-in-law took a much-needed vacation together.  When they dropped her off, their parting words were, “She is almost ready to walk, but make sure she waits until we get home!”

Famous last words…  Of course, as soon as they left the house, she was trying to walk – literally everywhere.  And after about 24 hours she was taking her first baby steps.  By the time they arrived back three days later, she was walking (a little unsteadily but walking none-the-less) and was very proud of herself.  Great strides in just a few days but predicated on all of the trial and error and lessons learned in the months before.

Financial planning is a little like this.  You’ll make mistakes along the way – everyone does.  But you will do a lot of things right as well and the important thing to remember is that your financial health is based on doing the little things right, all along the way.

So, what should you be doing when you are 22, 52 or 72?  Here are three important tips for each decade.

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Hear How Atlanta Financial Makes Life’s Journey Richer

Atlanta Financial TV is home to a variety of videos that allow clients and associates to obtain knowledge, insight and experience. Tune in to learn more about our approach to comprehensive wealth management.to comprehensive wealth management.

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